Activities

  • Agent Exoplanet

    Use the Agent Exoplanet interface to measure changes in the brightness of a star as an orbiting exoplanet transits. Contribute measurements to the Agent Exoplanet community. Describe an exoplanet light curve and its relationship to the physical process causing it.

  • Astronaut Training: Dexterity

    Working in teams, students must complete a jigsaw puzzle and reveal the hidden word as quickly as possible, while their dexterity is impaired, to simulate the difficulties faced by astronauts when attempting to fix satellites and instruments wearing bulky spacesuits. Assembling a puzzle quickly and correctly will help them understand the importance of dexterity, hand-eye coordination and communication -- essential skills for an astronaut!

  • Astronaut Training: Taste

    There are no refrigerators or ovens on the International Space Station, but that isn’t the only reason that eating can be a strange experience for astronauts. Due to lack of gravity and shifting fluids, things can taste very different in space. In this activity students will carry out a taste test to explore how our senses affect the flavour of our food, and what this might reveal about eating in space.

  • Calculate the Age of Ancient Cosmic Explosions

    In this project you will study LCOGT observations of supernova remnants to measure how fast they are expanding and calculate how long ago the supernova explosion occurred.

  • Calculating the Age of Cosmic Bodies

    Author: Sarah Greenstreet and Sarah Eve Roberts

    How old are the objects within our Solar System? One method scientists use to answer this important question is counting the number of craters on their surface. This information, combined with the time it takes for craters to form on each body, gives us a strong estimate how old the object is. In this activity students will put this method into practise to calculate the age of five bodies within our Solar System.

  • Craters in the classroom

    After carrying out this activity, students will understand the effect the mass, velocity and angle of an impacting object has on the resulting crater, in terms of diameter, depth and ejecta rays, and relate this information to the craters on the surfaces of Earth and the Moon.

  • Create a Hubble Tuning Fork diagram

    In this activity you will create stunning colour images of galaxies and add them to the Tuning Fork template to recreate the famous Hubble image.

  • Down2Earth: Making Impact Craters

    The aim of this activity is to understand the effect the mass and velocity of an impacting object has on the resulting crater, in terms of diameter, depth and ejecta rays and relate this information to the craters on the surfaces of Earth and the Moon.

  • How Big is the Solar System?

    How long would it take to travel to the Moon? Could you travel to the edge of the Solar System and beyond? In this activity students learn about the size of the Solar System, beginning with the Earth and Moon and reaching out to encompass the entire Solar System.

  • How to Create Stunning Colour Images of the Cosmos (Using GIMP)

    This guide will show you how to create beautiful colour images using free software that can be downloaded from the Internet.

  • How to Create Stunning Colour Images of the Cosmos (Using Photoshop)

    This article will tell you how to use Adobe Photoshop to make high quality color images with your astronomical data.

  • How to Create Stunning Colour Images of the Cosmos (Using Pixlr)

    This guide will show you how to create beautiful colour astronomical images, using a free web app called Pixlr. 

  • How to Find Images Using the LCO Observation Archive

    There are many thousands of astronomical data files in our archive. We've created an archive search page that lets you limit your search by different attributes. This guide will walk you through the steps to finding the images you want.

  • Measure the diameter of the Sun

    In this activity you will measure how fast the Sun moves to caclulate how big the Sun appears in the sky. All you need are some household items and about 20 minutes on a sunny day.

  • Measuring an Extrasolar Planet Transit

    If a planet passes directly between a star and an observer's line of sight, it blocks out a tiny portion of the star's light, thus reducing its apparent brightness. This is called the transit method and it's one of the most successful methods for discovering exo-planets. In this activity you will use sample data to measure for yourself, the change in brightness of a star to investigate whether a planet is passing in front of it.

  • Measuring the Age of the Universe

    The discovery of the expanding Universe was one of the greatest revelations in astronomy. During this activity students will relive Hubble’s monumental discovery by using real supernova spectra to create a famous Hubble Diagram.

  • Play Bingo with Charles Messier

    Play a game of bingo and learn about the many wonders of the cosmos!

  • Return to Earth: Build a Lander

    Students will work in groups to design, test and build a model lander to safely transport their “astronaut” to Earth. This activity will provide your class with an exciting context within which to explore the effects of gravity, air resistance and friction on movement.

  • Star in a Box

    Have you ever wondered what happens to the different stars in the night sky as they get older? This activity lets you explore the life-cycle of stars.

  • Star in a Box (Paper-based)

    Have you ever wondered what happens to stars as they get older? This activity lets you explore the lifecycle of stars. In this activity you will explore the evolution of stars with different masses.

  • The Cosmic Distance Ladder: Parallax

    Determining the position of a star or other object in space is an important concept in astronomy. During this activity you will learn how the distances to nearby stars can be measured using the parallax effect, and put this method into practise to determine the distance to nearby stars.