Astronomers use Global Telescope Network to Catch a Fleeting Kilonova for the First Time

Artist's illustration of two merging neutron stars. The narrow beams represent the gamma-ray burst while the rippling spacetime grid indicates the isotropic gravitational waves that characterize the merger. Swirling clouds of material ejected from the merging stars are a possible source of the light that was seen at lower energies. Credit:  National Science Foundation/LIGO/Sonoma State University/A. Simonnet

LCO astronomers help track close-approaching asteroid 2012 TC4

(Animation depicting the flyby of small asteroid 2012 TC4 as it passes under Earth. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Las Cumbres Observatory Receives $1,000,000 Grant from the Heising-Simons Foundation to Build a New Telescope

Call for proposals 2018A

Las Cumbres Observatory is soliciting proposals for science observations for the 2018A semester, which will begin on 1 December 2017 and run through 31 May 2018. This call is for astronomers from institutions without guarantees of Network time: the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), the University of Colorado, and the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC). Astronomers affiliated with LCO, including Time Allocation Committee members and Science Advisory Committee members, are also welcome to submit proposals. (LCO's Science Collaboration partners that have guaranteed time conduct independent proposal solicitations and reviews.)

Summer Interns Bring Project Serol to Life

The Las Cumbres Observatory education team tripled in size this summer, as four interns joined us to work on an exciting new project for elementary school students called 'Project Serol'.